Zammuto


Veryone

2016

Genre: Electronic

Style: Experimental

Label: Self-released

Best EP all year hands down. The feeling this album gives you is one of childlike warmth and fresh life.

Bandcamp description:

Over the past few months Nick Zammuto has been digging back into his seemingly endless backlog of rare tapes and LPs collected during the Books’ tours from 2005-2011. Veryone compiles the first three tracks that mark the beginning of a new line of sample-oriented work that Zammuto plans to develop into a full-length album in 2017. Of this new work, Zammuto says, “In many ways it feels like coming home.”

“My Dog’s Eyes” is based on an outdated list of children’s favorite things. Zammuto took each image, found its rhythmic heartbeat and intrinsic melody, and put them in order of increasing tempo as a structural basis for the track. He then composed additional instrumentation around this structure, in the process revealing the natural cadence and harmony within each phrase.

On “It Can Feel So Good,” Zammuto built a tuned array of PVC pipes and a device that holds a small speaker in the optimal position for re-recording sounds though them (pictured on the Veryone’s cover). Using Zammuto’s well- documented, innovative record-scratching process, unique vinyl rhythms were pushed through the pipes to create the rhythmic and melodic structures of the track. He coupled this with a beautiful voice from a vintage meditation tape from the 1970s, chopped and tuned to match the pipe resonances. A portion of this track originally appeared in the ‘New Now’ episode of Adult Swim’s show Off The Air.

For the final track, “Smolt,” Zammuto guitarist, Nick Oddy, donated an old Epiphone SG electric guitar, of which Nick Zammuto removed the frets. By tuning, pitching and delaying improvisations on the fretless guitar, Zammuto sequenced a number of interlocking melodies and rhythms. An old choral tape sample, which happened to be in the same key as the guitar, became the counterpoint. To complete the piece, a lot of ‘noise’ from recordings of rain and fire were adapted as a kind of “smoldering” backdrop.